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"Muscle Shoals" film
Posted by: Aquamarine ()
Date: September 7, 2013 23:59

I couldn't find a thread on this, though I'm sure there is one, but this can be melded or blended or fused into it.

Anyway, here are the dates for showings of the Muscle Shoals movie that Mick and Keith (among many others) are in:

9/27/2013
New York, NY: IFC Center 5

10/5/2013
Bridgeport, CT: Bijou Theatre

10/11/2013
Berkeley, CA: Shattuck Cinemas 10
Cambridge, MA: Kendall Square Cinema 9
Minneapolis, MN: Lagoon Cinema
Nashville, TN: Belcourt Theatre
Philadelphia, PA: Ritz at the Bourse
San Diego, CA: Ken Cinema
San Francisco, CA: Opera Plaza Cinemas 4
West Los Angeles, CA: Nuart Theatre

10/18/2013
Atlanta, GA: Midtown Art Cinemas 8
Birmingham, AL: Edge 12
Denver, CO: Chez Artiste
Durham, NC: Carolina Theatre - Durham
Greensboro, NC: Geeksboro Coffeehouse Cinema
Little Rock, AR: Market Street Cinema
Palm Desert, CA: Cinemas Palme D'Or 7
Seattle, WA: Varsity Theatre
Tallahassee, FL: Tallahassee Film Society / All Saints Cinema
Washington, DC: West End Cinema
Winston-Salem, NC: Aperture Cinema

10/22/2013
Boulder, CO: Boedecker Theater

10/24/2013
Milwaukee, WI: University of WI - Union Theatre

10/25/2013
Asheville, NC: Carolina Asheville 14
Athens, GA: Cine Theatre
Santa Fe, NM: The Screen

11/1/2013
Richmond, VA: Criterion Cinemas at Movieland

11/3/2013
Ooltewah, TN: Barking Legs Theater

11/5/2013
Boulder, CO: International Film Series

11/11/2013
Lafayette, LA: Acadiana Center for the Arts

11/15/2013
Fort Worth, TX: Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

11/26/2013
Houston, TX: The Museum of Fine Arts

Also coming up on iTunes:

Muscle Shoals movie details

Trailer for those who missed it:







Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2013-09-22 20:34 by bv.

Re: Muscle Shoals film dates
Posted by: Mr.D ()
Date: September 8, 2013 00:20

Been waiting on this and Twenty Feet From Stardom to come out on DVD...both should be out by the holidays, I hope!

Re: Muscle Shoals film dates
Posted by: 69firebird ()
Date: September 8, 2013 00:22

I'll be at the San Diego theater October 11 for sure!

Re: Muscle Shoals film dates
Posted by: RollingFreak ()
Date: September 8, 2013 01:32

Correct me if I'm wrong, these are the same guys that used to play with Bob Seger all the time, right? I'm a huge Bob Seger fan and if they are who I'm thinking of, I can't believe he wouldn't be included in the film at all. He used them on like all of his biggest albums.

Re: Muscle Shoals film dates
Posted by: stonehearted ()
Date: September 8, 2013 09:40

Thanks for the heads-up. I'll be viewing from Cambridge, MA, on October 11.


"Even Hearts of Stone Can Crack"

Re: Muscle Shoals film dates
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: September 8, 2013 09:57

good doco along side the tragedies of RicK Hall's life and picturesque footage of the local country-side ....Mick & Keith's comments are well worth a listen

ROCKMAN

Re: 'Muscle Shoals'
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: September 20, 2013 22:44

'Muscle Shoals': Land of 1,000 Hit Records

A New Documentary About the Alabama Music Mecca

By MARC MYERS
September 19, 2013


The crew at Muscle Shoals Sound, a breakaway studio founded in 1969 / Magnolia Pictures

When Southern soul emerged in the early 1960s, many black singers traveled to Muscle Shoals, Ala. to record at FAME Studios—home to local white musicians who had a knack for churning out R&B hits. By the late '60s, a second major studio opened in town—and between the pair they recorded dozens of hit albums by major artists ranging from the Rolling Stones and Jimmy Cliff to Etta James and Mac Davis.

The story of how a sleepy town on the Tennessee River wound up a recording magnet for A-list artists is told poetically in "Muscle Shoals" (Magnolia Pictures), a documentary that opens Sept. 27 at New York's IFC Center and nationwide on video on demand.

The film—which took six years to complete—includes on-screen interviews with artists who recorded there, including Aretha Franklin, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Clarence Carter, the late Wilson Pickett and Bono. "You think about the South and they didn't think black and white people could live together," says Bono in the film. "And yet here are vinyl records that prove that not only can they live together, you might not know who's black and who's white."

From its start in 1957, FAME was conceived as an R&B studio. "In our early years we all played in bands and listened to so much R&B that we developed a natural feel for it," said Rick Hall, 81, FAME's founder, producer and engineer, last week. "Black and white artists around here were friends—we all had poverty in common."

Mr. Hall also shared the blues. As a child, his 3-year-old brother fell into a pot of scalding water in the backyard and died. Soon after, his mother abandoned the family for prostitution. Years later, his first wife died when the car he was driving flipped over. "At the time I believed God had turned against me and I figured I had to work with a vengeance to be somebody special," Mr. Hall said.

FAME started by recording local talent, but as word spread, Otis Redding, Mr. Carter, Joe Tex and bigger names arrived. In 1966, when Mr. Hall heard a tape recording of "When a Man Loves a Woman" by local singer Percy Sledge, he called producer Jerry Wexler of Atlantic Records in New York as a favor. Atlantic released it as a single, and the song went to No. 1 on the pop and R&B charts.

As a reward, Wexler sent Mr. Pickett down to record, and a string of hits followed, including "Mustang Sally," "Funky Broadway" and "Land of 1,000 Dances." "Rick Hall had a rhythm section of exceptional players," says Mr. Wexler in the film. "There's just something that leaps out of a record—I call it the sonority of the record. It's the way the sound impacts on your ear, instantly. To me that's the magic ingredient. The Rolling Stones had it, the Beatles had it and Muscle Shoals had it." Next came Aretha Franklin in 1967, who recorded "I Never Loved a Man" and "Do Right Woman, Do Right Man" at FAME. The former became her first big hit.

"We didn't have arrangers—everyone in the rhythm section came up with their own parts," said pianist Spooner Oldham last week. "You'd just write a chord chart and everyone would play what they felt. Then we'd play off each other until everything blended well."

But FAME hit a snag with Ms. Franklin. In the film, Mr. Hall talks at length about an argument he had with Ms. Franklin's then-husband after he asked Mr. Hall to fire some of his musicians on the session. "Wexler was furious with me when Aretha and her husband left town afterward," Mr. Hall said last week. "He then hired my house band to come to New York to finish the rest of her first album. Aretha never came back to FAME."

As work slowed, four key members of the FAME rhythm section left in 1969 to start Muscle Shoals Sound Studios across town. Mr. Hall hired new musicians and branched out into recording top pop and country artists. Over at Muscle Shoals Sound, business dragged—until the Rolling Stones recorded tracks there in late 1969 for their "Sticky Fingers" album. After its release in 1971, major rock artists began booking time—including Bob Dylan, Alabama, Steve Winwood, Boz Scaggs and Paul Simon.

"Musicians feel something special in Muscle Shoals—they're isolated and connect with the soil and the river," said Mr. Sledge last week. "When you're relaxed, you open up and let things out."

[online.wsj.com]

Trailer For "Muscle Shoals" With Keith & Mick & Many Cool People
Posted by: Cocaine Eyes ()
Date: September 20, 2013 22:13

[www.magpictures.com]

In theatres, 27th September.

smoking smiley

------------------------
It's just that demon life.......



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2013-09-20 22:25 by Cocaine Eyes.

Re: Trailer For "Muscle Shoals" With Keith
Posted by: kowalski ()
Date: September 20, 2013 22:21

...and Mick.

Re: Trailer For "Muscle Shoals" With Keith
Posted by: Cocaine Eyes ()
Date: September 20, 2013 22:26

Quote
kowalski
...and Mick.

Thank you.....I've changed the thread title. My mistake......

smiling smiley

------------------------
It's just that demon life.......



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2013-09-20 22:28 by Cocaine Eyes.

Re: Trailer For "Muscle Shoals" With Keith
Posted by: kowalski ()
Date: September 20, 2013 22:31

Quote
Cocaine Eyes
Quote
kowalski
...and Mick.

Thank you.....I've changed the thread title. My mistake......

smiling smiley

thumbs upwinking smiley

Re: 'Muscle Shoals'
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: September 22, 2013 18:27



Keith w/Spooner Oldham - Both are in the new doc, “Muscle Shoals”. Watch the trailer here: [www.magpictures.com]

[twitter.com]

Re: Muscle Shoals film dates
Posted by: Beast ()
Date: September 22, 2013 19:06

UK screening dates and venues here:

[muscleshoals.co.uk]

Re: "Muscle Shoals" film
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: September 23, 2013 00:41

Thanks bye bye johnny .... pleeeze where is that Keith/Spooner shot from???

ROCKMAN

Re: "Muscle Shoals" film
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: September 27, 2013 16:24


Magnolia Pictures

NPR review includes a quip from Keith:

Music Doc Packs 'Muscle' (Plus A Whole Lotta Soul)

"Brown Sugar" was cut in Alabama, and Keith Richards says the Stones would have returned for Exile on Main Street, "but I wasn't allowed in the country at the time."

Full review - [www.npr.org]

Re: Muscle Shoals film dates
Posted by: Elmo Lewis ()
Date: September 27, 2013 17:42

Quote
RollingFreak
Correct me if I'm wrong, these are the same guys that used to play with Bob Seger all the time, right? I'm a huge Bob Seger fan and if they are who I'm thinking of, I can't believe he wouldn't be included in the film at all. He used them on like all of his biggest albums.

Yeah, Beautiful Loser through The Distance usually were about half with the Silver Bullet Band and the other half with the Muscle Shoals guys.

"No Anchovies, Please"

Re: "Muscle Shoals" film
Posted by: stupidguy2 ()
Date: September 28, 2013 18:23

Opened in New York this week and in wider release...
Reviews have been great, but this one, a rather tepid, 'meh', review...irked me.
I usually like this film critic, Manhola Dargis, but here, she sounds like someone who knows nothing about the subject and it shows it her review, which is academic and ...she seems to miss the point.

First, she calls it 'overstuffed with interviews, and 'lacking intellectual' something....

But this passage really irked me, and why a critic should have a handle of the subject at hand.


"That down-and-dirty ditty opens with “Gold Coast slave ship bound for cotton fields/Sold in a market down in New Orleans.” It would have been nice if Mr. Camalier addressed this song or the Confederate flag favored by Lynyrd Skynyrd, another Muscle Shoals client. But such difficult subjects make him skittish and sometimes lead him to make wincing choices, like Bono yammering on about race in America. That’s too bad because, while many of the famed Muscle Shoals musicians were white, this celebrated sound also has deep roots in African-American history and all the pretty fields in the movie that are now covered with sunflowers rather than broken bodies."

She seems to criticize the director for not exploring southern white racism...and then seems to suggest that this is another story of white guys playing 'black music'.
But she's really missing it: anybody who knows anything about the story of Muscle Shoals knows that it's story is just that: in the studio, there was no racism - and that's the lesson. Also, she seems to miss that these white musicians connected with black artists (most with roots in the south) and created something unique....and southern, not black or white. And that was the secret to their sound.
Like Stax, Muscle Shoals encapsulates what is singular about the south: a strangely integrated culture. For all their funk, they also had a countrified twang - that's what made southern soul different than Detroit or Philly.
This is what happens when film critics venture into uncharted territory.

Watch this great clip:

[insidemovies.ew.com]



Edited 5 time(s). Last edit at 2013-09-28 18:29 by stupidguy2.

Muscle Shoals trailer w/ Keith & Mick
Posted by: Marhsall ()
Date: October 3, 2013 07:26

Apologies if posted before...damn this looks great! Can't wait to see it









"Well my heavy throbbers itchin' just to lay a solid rhythm down''
[www.facebook.com]
[www.reverbnation.com]#!

Re: Muscle Shoals trailer w/ Keith & Mick
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: October 3, 2013 07:35

....make sure ya see the doco ... it played down here some time back at the Melbourne film-festival ......it's good ....

ROCKMAN

Re: Muscle Shoals trailer w/ Keith & Mick
Posted by: Title5Take1 ()
Date: October 3, 2013 07:41

Mick's and Keith's participation certainly makes me want to see it.

John Lennon said, "We were trying to get that bass sound Arthur Alexander was getting in Muscle Shoals, we love his records." The Beatles tried to record in America, but because of taxes or something never did, and I think Muscle Shoals was a hope of theirs.

Re: Muscle Shoals trailer w/ Keith & Mick
Posted by: Rockman ()
Date: October 3, 2013 08:12

....Keith says something like ... MS was the best or one the best studio's they
recorded in but they never ever got back there ...

ROCKMAN

Re: "Muscle Shoals" film
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: October 4, 2013 21:00

The Swampers with Candi Staton, John Paul White and Jason Isbell - David Letterman, October 3.




Re: "Muscle Shoals" film
Posted by: duke richardson ()
Date: October 4, 2013 21:32

Quote
bye bye johnny
The Swampers with Candi Staton, John Paul White and Jason Isbell - David Letterman, October 3.


Jimmy Johnson on guitar there...he was a big help recording Keith ..David Hood on bass...Spooner Oldham on keys...not sure who the drummer was but not Roger Hawkins ..?

Re: "Muscle Shoals" film
Posted by: bye bye johnny ()
Date: October 4, 2013 21:41

Drummer is Anton Fig of Letterman's CBS Orchestra.

Re: "Muscle Shoals" film
Posted by: Deltics ()
Date: October 4, 2013 21:53

[www.iorr.org]


"As we say in England, it can get a bit trainspottery"

Re: "Muscle Shoals" film
Posted by: lem motlow ()
Date: October 4, 2013 22:14

"That down-and-dirty ditty opens with “Gold Coast slave ship bound for cotton fields/Sold in a market down in New Orleans.” It would have been nice if Mr. Camalier addressed this song or the Confederate flag favored by Lynyrd Skynyrd, another Muscle Shoals client. But such difficult subjects make him skittish and sometimes lead him to make wincing choices, like Bono yammering on about race in America. That’s too bad because, while many of the famed Muscle Shoals musicians were white, this celebrated sound also has deep roots in African-American history and all the pretty fields in the movie that are now covered with sunflowers rather than broken bodies"



what was the director supposed say-"yeah mick jagger was down here,i think he was trying to start up the slave trade again" -"and skynyrd,yeah they were holding klan rallies behind the studio"

Re: "Muscle Shoals" film
Posted by: TonyMo ()
Date: October 4, 2013 22:39

Well, I saw the movie and thought it excellent. The only 'Swampers' on the Letterman clip I recognized were Johnson, Hood and Spooner Oldham...and of course the great Candi Staton who recorded perhaps her best sides with Rick Hall.

Re: "Muscle Shoals" film
Posted by: stupidguy2 ()
Date: October 5, 2013 04:56

Quote
lem motlow
"That down-and-dirty ditty opens with “Gold Coast slave ship bound for cotton fields/Sold in a market down in New Orleans.” It would have been nice if Mr. Camalier addressed this song or the Confederate flag favored by Lynyrd Skynyrd, another Muscle Shoals client. But such difficult subjects make him skittish and sometimes lead him to make wincing choices, like Bono yammering on about race in America. That’s too bad because, while many of the famed Muscle Shoals musicians were white, this celebrated sound also has deep roots in African-American history and all the pretty fields in the movie that are now covered with sunflowers rather than broken bodies"



what was the director supposed say-"yeah mick jagger was down here,i think he was trying to start up the slave trade again" -"and skynyrd,yeah they were holding klan rallies behind the studio"

It might have fit into her stereotypical view of the south better.
idiotic, shallow and condescending review.
And is it just me or does this reviewer sound really, really young?

The recording studio can be a magical place where the songs you now know and love are first born, and there are many factors go into making that magic a reality – a talented artist, just the right hook, a producer with a keen ear, a dedicated engineer, the perfect microphone placement. But there is one other factor that certain studios are also able to deliver: an iconic sound. Earlier this year Sundance premiered two different documentaries that gave audiences an inside look at two famous recording studios – one located in rural Alabama and the other on the outskirts of the entertainment capital that is Los Angeles (i.e. “The Valley”). Nearly a country apart in more ways than one.

Muscle Shoals focused on the Alabama town that housed FAME Studios which produced some of the biggest hits of the 1960s and 1970s such as “I’ll Take You There,” “When a Man Loves a Woman,” “Mustang Sally,” and “Freebird.” Where Muscle Shoals explored the location’s unique sound, Sound City focused on a more tangible object – the studio’s Neve board which helped produce hit albums for artists such as Fleetwood Mac, Rick Springfield, Tom Petty, and Slipknot. Not to mention Sound City’s musician-turned-director, Dave Grohl, who recorded there with his former band (one you may have heard of), Nirvana.
With the release of Muscle Shoals last week, I wanted to revisit these two films as one documentary brought the music to life while the other seemed to circle around the same idea for the majority of its run-time. Telling the real-life story can be a tricky undertaking – filmmakers need to deliver information while still engaging and entertaining. Normally, music documentaries have a leg up on this challenge since they are filled with great songs that keep them from feeling like you just took a trip back to your former school days.

The is no question both FAME Studios and Sound City produced ground breaking music, but the way these stories were documented caused Muscle Shoals to end up leaving me cold while Sound City left me invigorated.


On description alone, Muscle Shoals should have been slightly more interesting because it attempted to explain the intangible reason this studio created such amazing music while Sound City had a much more specific and material reason to point to regarding the studio’s success and the memorable music it created. Both documentaries are interesting peeks behind the curtain that is the business of recording music, but the idea of capturing and understanding something intangible would seem to give Muscle Shoals the advantage of intrigue.

Unfortunately Greg “Freddy” Camalier’s documentary, which starts off strong, begins to jump between the film’s various interview subjects too much, almost at random, and revisits conversations first posed at the beginning of the film without truly wrapping them into the film’s conclusion. The artists and studio musicians interviewed (from Aretha Franklin to Bono) are unquestionably fascinating, but would have been better served if these interviews seemed to link the various stories together rather than presenting them in a way that came across like jumbled thoughts.


As I noted in my review of the film, it was clear Camalier was creating a film about a subject and phenomenon he was interested in, but Muscle Shoals lacked the passion that normally comes with music, and in a music doc, needs to shine through.

And that is where Sound City delivered.

Grohl had a personal interest in the subject matter of Sound City, having recorded at the studio and fallen in love with the sound of the Neve console, but he used that as a gateway to bring the audience in. Grohl introduced the studio through his eyes, but quickly turned things over to those who worked in the studio and intercut their passion for the studio with the iconic music recorded there, creating a connection even the most casual music fan should feel. Sound City certainly benefits from the fact that the studio has just closed its doors and emotions were running high, but that is exactly what is needed in a music documentary – a way to bring people in to the passion and make them a part of it.

Music is all about emotion and connection and a good music doc should be able to deliver that feeling, not just talk about it. The difference may come down to the fact that Muscle Shoals was created by a fellow “outsider” hoping to understand more about that magical place whereas Sound City featured someone from the “inside” inviting viewers to experience what it was like to record at the studio. In my review of the film, I noted, “Grohl does not simply tell you why Sound City was important, he takes you through the studio’s journey.”

Reflecting back on both FAME Studios and Sound City, which attributed so much to music’s history, is important and compelling, but where Muscle Shoals seemed to fade out quietly, Sound City played itself out with a renewed fever. Artists still go down to Muscle Shoals to record and channel the “magic” of that place, but Grohl pointed audiences towards a potential new future that combined the nostalgia of the analogue Neve board sound of Sound City with the future of digital recording. Instead of pitting the two methods against each other, Grohl showed how the two methods can actually work together as he recorded alongside digital artists like Trent Reznor, hinting at a new era of music and a new sound documentarians may be reflecting on decades from now. Most importantly, he did so without offering answers, allowing audiences to think about both the past and the future, and what sound they may hope the future holds.

We will always have music, but the way it is being recorded and what ingredients provide the magic are definitely changing. But no matter what the future holds, or what sound defines it, hopefully the documentaries that capture it will remember to focus on the passion and make those who may not have been there to experience it feel like they have.




Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 2013-10-05 04:58 by stupidguy2.

Re: "Muscle Shoals" film
Posted by: filstan ()
Date: October 5, 2013 13:53

It's available on DirectTV.

Re: "Muscle Shoals" film
Posted by: Aquamarine ()
Date: October 6, 2013 10:06

It is?? Excellent info, thanks!

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